wearethe99percent:

It is rare that we post something other than the photos, but this has some important information to remember as we prepare for #mayday http://occupywallst.org #m1gs

Define what “fair” is. The top 1% is already paying a higher percent of taxes than everyone else. If “fair” meant “equal”, then that would mean that everyone would pay the same tax percentage regardless of income. If we had a flat tax rate (i.e. same tax % for everyone), then the rich would actually be paying LESS than they are now. Or perhaps “fair” means that everyone pays the same “fixed” tax amount each year. In this system, the rich will again pay less taxes than they are now. Yet the rich use the same public schools, same police officers, same roads, and same bridges as everyone else. So what is “fair”? How about instead of blaming the rich, you turned the blame to yourself? For example, let’s imagine all the rich were suddenly assassinated tomorrow. And then there was no upper-class anymore. In that scenario, all of the middle-class would have to pay MORE taxes to make up for the sudden drop in tax revenue. And that’s pretty much what will happen if we raise more taxes on the rich. They will leave the country and live somewhere were taxes are lower. So, good luck trying to take money from the rich to pay for your entitlements. How about if you try to get rich yourself by working harder? I started off in the lower class and made my way to the upper class by working harder. Obama did the same thing. He’s part of the 1%, too. If your excuse is that you can’t get rich, because you’re not as good as Obama, then just accept that you’re not that good, and don’t deserve better. If you see an athlete win a gold medal at the Olympics, do you ask him to break the medal in pieces and share it with everyone else because it was more “fair”? Or does that athlete deserve to keep that medal, because he trained hard for it while you did not train as hard as he did? Let’s suppose that we tax the rich heavily and get “$4 trillion” in extra tax revenue. A large portion of that money will be ripped out of the stock markets, because rich people invest their money instead of spending it on XBOX’s or adding spoilers to crappy import cars. Do you think that ripping $4 trillion out of the stock markets is going to be great for the economy? There’s a reason why most lottery winners become bankrupt after a few years. It’s because lottery winners are usually poor and dumb. This means that they don’t know how to spend their money wisely and invest in good investments. Rich people do, and that’s why they are able to grow their money. You see, if you give a lot of money to smart guys, they will make more out of that money and in turn, add more to the tax revenue. But if you give money to a bunch of dumb guys, then they will just blow the money on weed or other bad investments. You might argue and say, “Hey, poor people can make good investments, too!” That’s very true! And those people end up joining the rich from their good investments.

So to summarize, as long as people from the lower-class can still become part of the upper-class using the public tools that are provided for free, then there is nothing wrong with the system. The problem isn’t the system. The problem is the people. As more and more dumb people multiply, there will be more dumb people. With more dumb people, we need more money to babysit these dumb people. If the whole world was made of rich, smart people, then there wouldn’t be this problem of lack of money. But if the whole world was made of poor, stupid people, then your problem will get worse. So… who’s the real problem in this world?

this is for everybody especially you

Got a weird submission to my blog today:

I am a selfish attention whore who demands that everybody look at me regardless of what I have to say has merit. I demand that people bow down to my politics regardless of political orientation or belief (hell I couldn’t care less what I really believe). I’ve lost any and all concept of what the debate is anymore because I’m too busy fighting nonsense rhetoric with my own brand of nonsense rhetoric. I just demand that my voice shout out the loudest and drown out all others because nothing is more supreme than to be the center of the universe.

 I am the 100% (of America, Land of the Spoiled and Home of the Rotten)

Not everyone in America is like this. The majority of us are reasonable and sensible. The problem is that the media doesn’t cover the reasonable ones. The extreme ones are the ones who they cover. This only gives the illusion that Americans are “Spoiled”, “Rotten” “Attention whores”. It’s much like how we view Islamic people living in the Middle East as angry terrorists. What you see on the news has been shewing our perception of others.

asker

notrachel2 asked: You make good points, but your condescending tone is so off-putting that it discredits you. Just a suggestion, but if you say things nicely you might be taken more seriously. Thanks!

Yea, I guess I should have taken the high-road and laid off the condescending tone that the other side has taken. Let me attack the issue from a different perspective: Acceptance (the final stage).

Having money and luxuries is overrated. Live frugally and accept your place in society. Happiness is relative. A poor person can be happier than a rich person if he just remembers to stay positive. A rich person can be unhappy when things don’t go their way. For example, their grass is not green enough or a bird pooped on their Bentley. See? It’s all relative. Just be happy with what you have and if you can’t get it, then either work for it or accept that you can’t get it. Don’t go protesting and disrupting other people’s work because you can’t get what you want. Heck, I can’t play in the NBA because I’m too short. Does that mean that I should start protesting on the streets? Just like how protesting will not make me taller, protesting will not make you smarter, more hard working, or create more jobs. The protesting is counter-productive. What has been accomplished with the protesting? All I see is the police wasting their time monitoring the protests when they could be out fighting crime. And all I see is a bunch of able-bodied people who could be out doing work and making money, but instead waste their time camping out on streets. It’s time to accept the life that was given to you. I have accepted that I can’t play in the NBA by protesting. Maybe it’s time that you should accept that you will not get richer by protesting.

asker

stompingjoe asked: Get your ass back on this tumblr and continue writing. I know I'm listening closely, and I'm sure that there are others out there like myself. It's just that we're not as loud as the 99%. We're actually oppressed for being 1% sympathizers. Freedom of speech only applies to Many, not us. Even if nobody is reading it the internet is a huge archive of human knowledge. You'll make a difference for future generations. Not saying write EVERY day, but if/when something hits you once a month, write it.

Thanks. I stopped writing because I got tired of being shouted down, having my life threatened and because I didn’t think that I was actually converting anyone. If you read my “Unteachable” piece, it describes how I think that these people will never switch sides. It’s almost as if they are in their own bubble where any opinions opposing theirs will be quickly rejected. It’s similar to rooting for their home team. They will fight and shout with others, because they have a strong belief that their team is the best and have a strong altruism when it comes to being on a team. I don’t see these violent occupy movements any different from sports riots.

I do want to update on my life. I started day trading, because it seems like people who invest become richer. I wanted to test out the theory that if you move money around, you end up making money. The idea was to make money from money without much manual labor. The rich get richer as they say. It turns out that it was true in a way. In my first day of trading, I converted $50,000 into $53,000. All I had to do was click “Buy” on my browser and “Sell” a few hours later. It was amazing how easy it was to make money. But then later on, I made a bad trade, and lost a lot of money, too. So, now I do a ton of research before I make trades. This research amounts to mental labor, so there really isn’t something called “Free” money. You still have to make the right decisions to make money. Whether or not you consider making decisions work is questionable. But I think that having the right people make the right decisions is the key to a thriving economy. And any research you do should be considered work. So even though the manual labor behind day trading is as simple as pressing a button, the mental labor is intense. The stress level is pretty high when you’re watching yourself lose money. Almost anyone can become a day trader. So I don’t even see this as a privilege that only rich people can do. Therefore I don’t see why people should Occupy Wall St. I think that those who are against Wall St. don’t really understand how it works.

I suggest people watch this video before they complain about Wall St. again:



You see? Without Wall St and corporations, there would be way less jobs and manufacturing available. There probably wouldn’t even be a computer for you guys to type on.

Adam Corolla is on my side apparently. Has he been reading my tumblr :)?

The real ‘1 percent’ - by Michael Tanner

So just who are those top 1 percent of Americans that we’re all supposed to hate?

If you listen to President Obama, the protesters at Occupy Wall Street, and much of the media, it’s obvious. They’re either “trust-fund babies” who inherited their money, or greedy bankers and hedge-fund managers. Certainly, they haven’t worked especially hard for their money. While the recession has thrown millions of Americans out of work, they’ve been getting even richer. Worse, they don’t even pay their fair share in taxes: Millionaires and billionaires are paying a lower tax rate than their secretaries.

In reality, each of these stereotypes is wrong.

Roughly 80 percent of millionaires in America are the first generation of their family to be rich. They didn’t inherit their wealth; they earned it. How? According to a recent survey of the top 1 percent of American earners, slightly less than 14 percent were involved in banking or finance.

Roughly a third were entrepreneurs or managers of nonfinancial businesses. Nearly 16 percent were doctors or other medical professionals.

Lawyers made up slightly more than 8 percent, and engineers, scientists and computer professionals another 6.6 percent.

Sports and entertainment figures — the folks flying in on their private jets to express solidarity with Occupy Wall Street — composed almost 2 percent.

By and large, the wealthy have worked hard for their money. NYU sociologist Dalton Conley says that “higher-income folks work more hours than lower-wage earners do.”

Because so much of their income is tied up in investments, the recession has hit the rich especially hard. Much attention has been paid recently to a Congressional Budget Office study that showed incomes for the top 1 percent rose far faster from 1980 until 2007 than for the rest of us. But the nonpartisan Tax Foundation has found that since 2007, there has been a 39 percent decline in the number of American millionaires.

Among the “super-rich,” the decline has been even sharper: The number of Americans earning more than $10 million a year has fallen by 55 percent. In fact, while in 2008 the top 1 percent earned 20 percent of all income here, that figure has declined to just 16 percent. Inequality in America is declining.

As for not paying their fair share, the top 1 percent pay 36.7 percent of all federal income taxes. Because, as noted above, they earn just 16 percent of all income, that certainly seems like more than a fair share.

Maybe Warren Buffett is paying a lower tax rate than his secretary, as he claims. But the comparison is misleading because Buffett’s income comes mostly from capital gains, which were already taxed at their origin through the corporate-income tax.

Moreover, the Buffetts of the world are clearly an exception. Overall, the rich pay an effective tax rate (after all deductions and exemptions) of roughly 24 percent. For all taxpayers as a group, the average effective tax rate is about 11 percent.

Beyond taxes, the rich also pay in terms of private charity. Households with more than $1 million in income donated more than $150 billion to charity last year, roughly half of all US charitable donations. Greedy? It hardly seems so.

And let us not forget the fact that the rich provide the investment capital that funds ventures, creates jobs and spurs innovation. The money that the rich save and invest is the money that companies use to start or expand businesses, buy machinery and other physical capital and hire workers.

It has become fashionable to ridicule the idea of the rich as “job creators,” but if the rich don’t create jobs, who will? How many workers have been hired recently by the poor?

No doubt dishonest or unscrupulous businessmen have gotten rich by taking advantage of others. And few of us are likely to lose much sleep over the plight of the rich.

But shouldn’t public policy be based on something more than class warfare, envy and stereotypes?

The End

I know that I haven’t been active on Tumblr for a while. It is probably the end of this Tumblr for me.

I don’t know if I’m actually making a difference (which is something that the occupiers should ponder as well). This blog started off as a joke between me and another 1%’er to make light of the whole situation. But as I got into it, and really started listening to what was being said, this blog became a source of information. It exists to give the other side of the story. It exists to give the people on the other side reassurance that they are not alone (even though we’re a minority, it seems). It exists because the other 99%’ers (not all of them) are too zombie-like to offer other 99%’ers real advice. They just agree with whatever the other 99%’ers say no matter what she/he says (so as long as she/he mentions that she/he is a 99%’er at the end). This is destructive. It takes away the responsibility that 99%’er has over his/her own life. They should take control of their own life and to take care of themselves. By blaming others for their problems and begging for handouts, they are admitting that their life is controlled by others and that they need someone (the government) to control their life further in order for them to survive.

Anyway, this is probably the end for this blog. I’ve coded two more major apps since the creation of this blog. Those apps have made me even more money. And I could have done it even if I were a 99%’er. I even bought myself a new Aventador for a daily driver. Frivolous? Yes. But it’s my way of coping with my life. It’s better than taking drugs/alcohol (like some rich young celebs do), because at least I’m not harming myself. So while I accomplished all that, what have you Occupiers done? Learned how to live like a homeless person?

I hope that this blog served its purpose. I picked up a few followers, and I am grateful for each and every one of you. You guys made me feel less lonely in a way. I am sorry if feelings were hurt by my words. But in the end, they’re just words - musings of a young man who likes to question the “norm”. And if there’s only one thing that any of you reading this will take away from it, let it be that the norm is not always right. Keep questioning and keeping learning, but never trap yourself in a single mindset. Don’t be a prisoner to your own beliefs, and especially not to the beliefs of others. Know that this world is not always about good vs. evil, have-not’s vs have’s, left-wing vs right-wing, or Christianity vs other religions. It’s not always about just one side being bad guys and the other side not. That kind of good vs. evil plot is only for the religious dogma and movie plots, because those things were made for simpletons.

They say that if you ever get into an argument with someone, you should walk a mile in his shoes. That way, you’ll be a mile away from that person and also have his shoes.

P.S. I will still be around to answer questions every now and then. But I think I answered most questions already (so feel free to browse my Tumblr). Also, feel free to spread the word around about this Tumblr and share it with friends (even the 99%’er Tumblr).

Dear Occupiers - by mechanicalaesthetic

This is crazy long, thoughts rolling for weeks.  Thanks to anyone who actually sits through this.

Your movement is frustrating to watch, and now it looks like you’re sticking to it for the sake of dragging it on rather than having a real goal.  Early on you seemed to have purpose, before that basically dissolved as you apparently became proud of being directionless and without leaders.  Now it’s just a lot of confusion and misinformation, where you’re ruled by your emotions and rhetoric rather than logic and data.

Did you know that your occupations are actually costing taxpayers and the city tons of money?  Some cities can hoof the cost, but not forever.  Maybe you justify it, saying it’s for the greater good.  While people may sympathize with your cause, it’s selfish to be such a burden.  The extra police, the donations, the clean-ups; all of it is for the Occupiers, and yet how ungrateful the movement seems when I read about it.  When the Occupiers complain that there doesn’t need to be any of those things, that the city doesn’t need to use money - yes they do, for your own protection and safety.  Honestly, I think the Occupiers would complain regardless of what the city did.

I don’t think the media tries to portray the Occupiers in a bad light, even when it reports the extreme minority that behaves badly.  Large gatherings are going to get some bad people, and they don’t represent the whole.  However, it’s hard to take it seriously when I read about people who left their jobs (!!) to sit in a park for weeks, about people who made really bad decisions and want someone else to foot the bill, and so on.  While I know the actual criminals are a tiny number, I think many are also aware that there are too many of you who are a nuisance, harassing local business (who by the way are just like you, but they succeeded in their choices and a little bit of luck) and making life difficult and uncomfortable for everyone else.  Sounds kind of familiar, doesn’t it?

@nuancedapproach: For the most part I agree with 1%Batman’s responses, I just wanted to hear his thoughts.  I don’t think people are more complex than they think they are, but the way the everything works together is certainly a mystery.  If you accuse him of not knowing how the world works, then holy hell you have no idea either.  I think your responses are a little too grey, because you’re trying to be open to the infinite subtle variables of human thought and nature.

If it helps to understand, here’s my sob story.  My family started out 1%, but before I was born they lost everything, so I grew up poor too.  Then we made some successful choices, worked really hard, and I got a taste of what it’s like to live as a 1% for a while.  It was nice and fun, but it also exposed me to other aspects of people.  Negative qualities - people who judge or resent you because you have money, not knowing who really wants to be your friend, and so on.  Turns out money doesn’t solve personal problems, either.  I’m sure it would have been worse if at the time I had no money, but my friends who had much less than I did were very smart about trying to find work or going through government aid like school loans or other ways of paying for medical bills.  They didn’t make bad choices - they saved, worked hard, didn’t waste years, time and money getting a Liberal Arts Degree.  They didn’t ask anyone else to give them money.

Anyway, things happened and we lost all of it again.  They were unforeseen and uncontrollable circumstances, but I assure you we didn’t leave a bag of money with someone or give our credit card information to someone claiming to be a Prince.  No, we lost it not just because of 99ers who did not control their greed.

It would be wrong if I judged any group because of that though, because in the end people are people.  I’m tempered because I’ve been 99 and 1, so in a cheesy way that makes me a whole 100.  I understand all of it, which is why I can’t support the 99 movement.  Far too many of you want what you haven’t earned, or want someone else to support the foolish mistakes you made.  A scant few of you are in my situation, but we’re still not poverty stricken.  We may have little, but we’re not homeless yet, and that should be good enough.

If you have an average life, you might not be happy with it and it might not be glamorous, but there’s nothing wrong with being average. If anything, I think it makes your special moments even more spectacular.  There’s nothing shameful about any kind of job, especially if it’s to feed your family.  I know a lot of people are huge jerks to the average worker, even as they work themselves.  They’re hypocrites, looking down on the fastfood guy or stripper, treating them like garbage.  You’re all in this together, you all serve each other.

As much as you villify them, even the wealthy need you, as you need them.  Without the 99 they couldn’t make money, and without their money the 99 can’t really exist.

I think too many of modern society comes from a mindset where things SEEM free, so they expect and demand things for free.  1st World Problems.  Entertainment and education must be widespread/encouraged, and a great deal IS free, but if ALL of it was free then we couldn’t continue to keep giving out free information/entertainment.  Do you understand how that works?  Someone out there bled to get you those things, but you can’t even appreciate that.  You just complain that DVD sets and games are too expensive because you don’t want to shell out $60 ‘for a CD’, without realizing that it took entire teams of people to put those together.  Also, don’t spend $60 on a CD if you have no money.

Why don’t you target what really matters, and learn some humility in the process?  Figure out where things come from, and appreciate it.  Get colleges to cull degrees they know are worthless.  Make them teach real skills instead of liberal garbage.  Get corrupt bank executives to step down, instead of being covered up by bailouts and their high powered lawyers.

Shame on you who are incapable of putting aside your ideals (vegan cook lady, I can’t believe that’s even a degree) to feed your kids, and what the hell for the people who LEFT THEIR JOBS.

wearethe99percent:

I believed in working for nonprofits to make the world better. Raised hundreds of thousands and my reward was to get fired.
My unemployment ran out in June. Now I have three part time jobs. My boyfriend’s programming job was sent overseas and I’ve been supporting us for two years.  I have $25,000 in student loan debt and we can’t save. We are one disaster away from being on the street.
I believe there IS something you can do. If you work at a big bank or financial services firm, become a master of creative incompetence. Undermine the system from within. Let’s take our country back.
I am the 99 percent.

Just because your boyfriend’s job was sent overseas doesn’t mean that there are no more programming jobs in the U.S. Instead of working at a nonprofit and helping others, you should have helped yourself first. By working for a non-profit and collecting unemployment, you are basically taking tax payer dollars to pay for your bad decisions. Another bad decision is to entice people to not do their jobs and, even worse, ask them to sabotage their workplace. Just because you made bad decisions in your lifetime and are suffering from them, doesn’t mean that you should bring everyone else down with you. A bank did not tell you to rack up student debt. A bank did not tell you work for a non-profit. A bank did not make your boss fire you. So why are you blaming the bank for your problems anyway?

wearethe99percent:

I believed in working for nonprofits to make the world better. Raised hundreds of thousands and my reward was to get fired.

My unemployment ran out in June. Now I have three part time jobs. My boyfriend’s programming job was sent overseas and I’ve been supporting us for two years.  I have $25,000 in student loan debt and we can’t save. We are one disaster away from being on the street.

I believe there IS something you can do. If you work at a big bank or financial services firm, become a master of creative incompetence. Undermine the system from within. Let’s take our country back.

I am the 99 percent.

Just because your boyfriend’s job was sent overseas doesn’t mean that there are no more programming jobs in the U.S. Instead of working at a nonprofit and helping others, you should have helped yourself first. By working for a non-profit and collecting unemployment, you are basically taking tax payer dollars to pay for your bad decisions. Another bad decision is to entice people to not do their jobs and, even worse, ask them to sabotage their workplace. Just because you made bad decisions in your lifetime and are suffering from them, doesn’t mean that you should bring everyone else down with you. A bank did not tell you to rack up student debt. A bank did not tell you work for a non-profit. A bank did not make your boss fire you. So why are you blaming the bank for your problems anyway?

asker

nuancedapproach asked: Here's another example. In your workinghard post, you have great points here, but they're weakened when you limit the scope of your argument to a simple conclusion to acquire marketable skills and apply them for monetary compensation. Yes, you can argue that some people in Occupy may expect more for less, but some also expect more for more. There are imbalances in the socioeconomic structure. To dismiss the protests so casually like that is to deny the imbalances exist.

I don’t doubt that there are imbalances in the socioeconomic structure. For example, women get paid less than men do for the same amount of work. Black people get paid less than white people do for the same job positions. Why is that? Because those bosses are assholes who make generalizations. But you guys are doing the same generalizations about rich people. You assume that we don’t have better use for the money. You assume that our money was gotten through ill means or inherited. So you want to tax the rich broadly. But why not target specifically those who got their money through ill means? Why are you painting such broad strokes across the 1%’ers? Why must I suffer for someone else’s greed? I will gladly give more to those who put out more. I don’t dismiss the entire Occupy movement for the actions of a few. I was for the movement when they started. I thought their focus was to go after the bank executives who screwed everyone. But instead, the movement turned into some kind of money-begging, sob-story-telling, anti-rich class war. You want a sob story? How about mine? How about I tell about how my father committed suicide after his older brother fired him from his company. How about I tell you about how my mother is mentally ill? How about I tell you about the long hours I spent studying and working to get to where I am now? How about I tell you about how I code until 9 AM when I fall asleep on my keyboard? Everyone has a sob story. Boo-freaking-hoo. Don’t like your boss or your job? I didn’t either. That’s why I created my own job and became my own boss. If you are not able to, then you don’t deserve more money. Simple as that. Don’t think that you’re worth more than you actually are. It seems like Americans have that problem, because they grew up being proud and pampered. This recession is the WWII of our generation. Just be glad that you’re just unemployed rather than in the muddy trenches being shot at by artillery rounds. I’m sure those soldiers would rather be sitting at home watching TV all day and “sending out 100’s of resumes”. I mean if you can’t get a job by the 100th resume you send out, then you need to look in the mirror and ask yourself why are you so worthless. Once you realize that you are worthless, then you can stop begging to get paid more. Chances are, you are paid exactly the right amount. Why do I know this? Because there are people in other countries who are working for way less than you do.